The OOVE: A Brand New Instrument

Do you know what an OOVE is? We didn’t either. That is until we met with composer Nathaniel Stookey who told us about this brand new instrument that inspired his new piece called YTTE (Yield To Total Elation). The OOVE was made by a friend of his, Oliver DiCicco who has a workshop in San Francisco. Oliver specializes in kinetic sound sculptures that create a mixture of unique tones and vibrations. Lucky for us, we got to visit his local studio and see his other creations like these “Sirens” that create such an eerie sound but are so mesmerizing to watch.

(Click to PLAY the video and see for yourself!)


 Shortly after Nathaniel saw Oliver’s instruments, the San Francisco Symphony commissioned him to write a new piece for their SoundBox series (which I HIGHLY recommend). He immediately knew this was going to be something extraordinary.

The OOVE makes a low vibration sound which he used as the foundation of YTTE. The piece opens with a low hummmm and slowly an evolution of sound is created as the strings and the winds join in. Your mind is taken on a beautiful journey filled with emotion and movement throughout the entire piece. It’s calming and mysterious and then you suddenly feel like you’ve arrived into a grand galaxy that’s driven by brass, the bass drum, and pulses from the winds. Nathaniel said, “…for me, yielding to total elation during a piece of music is the ideal. It’s why I do what I do.”

To play the OOVE, the instrument is not bowed or plucked. In fact, it’s hardly ever touched! You approach it with an electromagnet. As the electromagnet gets closer to the field created by the nodes, it reacts by vibrating the strings. The vibrations get larger and larger the closer the node gets to the magnet while also creating additional layers of frequencies.

After hearing Nathaniel’s YTTE at the San Francisco Symphony’s groundbreaking Soundbox, Donato Cabrera and the Las Vegas Philharmonic commissioned a full orchestra version, which premiered earlier this year. If you didn’t get to see either of these amazing performances, you’re in luck! On September 24th YTTE for full orchestra is making its West Coast debut at California Symphony’s Season Opener.


Check out our exclusive interview with both Donato and Nathaniel about the OOVE, their road trip from San Francisco to Las Vegas and more about their story behind their West Coast Premiere… with a surprise at the end!! 

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You can purchase tickets to see this modern-day masterpiece by clicking HERE!
Click here to see more Red Curtain Addict backstage stories.

Julie Adams sings Mimí in San Francisco Opera’s La Bohéme

La Bohéme has always been on of my favorite operas because I’m in LOVE with the Broadway production Rent! Did you know that Rent was based on Giacomo Puccini’s opera?? Yes, there are a few differences (okay, maybe a lot) but Jonathan Larson created Rent because he wanted to update the setting and story of a classic opera to modern day times, which I can definitely get behind. Both stories focus on the difficulties of living in poverty and the dangers of a life lived away from conventional standards. Another major similarity is the famous scene when Mimí knocks on the door of her neighbor and asks him to light her candle. Such a great moment!

Earlier this year I went backstage to get a hair and makeup tutorial on how to look like Mimí. And recently I got to sit down with Julie Adams who is performing Mimí in San Francisco Opera’s production of La Boheme this summer! Julie has such a beautiful spirit and her voice is plush with expression and rich with passion. It’s like she was made for this role! Check some clips of of our interview here:

5 Fun Facts about Soprano, Julie Adams

1. When did you start singing opera?

I started when I was 18 years old but I grew up singing pop and musical theater because I originally wanted to be a Broadway singer. It wasn’t until later in high school that I discovered classical music was the perfect fit for my voice. After that, I never looked back!

2. What is your favorite thing to do when you aren’t singing opera?

I love trying new restaurants around San Francisco with my friends. There are so many great hidden gems here and the food is fantastic!

3. Have you ever messed up on stage and how did you recover?

Yes! There was a pretty hard scene in The Makropulos Case (the music is in Czech!) where I need the prompter to help me with some cues but when I looked down for him, he was gone! The music went by and I had forgotten my line. Luckily my counterpart kept going. My adrenaline kicked in and I was able to catch back up! It’s in these moments where you really just have to lock eyes with the conductor and they will help you get back on the right track.

4. What piece of advice would you give yourself 10 years ago?

Trust in yourself. When you trust in yourself and be true to who you are, you can do anything you put your mind to.

5. What are you working on after your performances as Mimí?

This fall I’m going to perform in the Marriage of Figaro as the Countess with the Michigan Opera Theatre! I’m very excited because it’s my first time to sing this role.

To see Julie Adams perform as Mimí in the San Francisco Opera’s production of La Boheme on June 20 & 25, 2017, click here.

To find out more about Julie Adams, click here.

To see more behind the scenes stories from Red Curtain Addict, click here!

5 Reasons Why SF Opera Lab Should be on Your Bucket List this Spring

Last year, the San Francisco Opera started a new series called SF Opera Lab. Why is it called “Lab”? Because the Taube Atrium Theater (in the Veterans building) was created to experiment and make new music in unique and innovative ways. If you went last year, you probably fell in love with its intimate setting, outstanding acoustics, new operatic works and cup holders for your favorite glass of wine or cocktail! This casual environment makes it fun for a newcomer and fresh for a regular opera-goer.

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Recently I had the opportunity to take an exclusive tour of the venue with Sean Waugh, the Artistic Planning Manager who helps oversee this exciting new series. During our walk-through, I discovered hidden gems around the venue and got the inside scoop on the second season of concerts. Scroll below to see five reasons why you should put this unique experience on your Bucket List this spring.

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1) The SF Opera Lab Stage is ever-changing. This theater is truly unique because the audience is placed in different configurations that are built around each experiential performance. One night there will be risers that will look down on the stage and the next there will be chairs (and even tables!) around a circular stage that’s placed in the middle of the room. No experience is the same!

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2) This theater has historical landmarks at every turn. In 1935, SFMoma began its legacy in this great space where they housed the first west coast collection that was solely made up of modern and contemporary art. This room use to be SFMoma’s Sculpture Garden and if you look around the rim of the theater, you’ll see the original engravings of artists’ names in every corner. There are also other historical landmarks that are found around the building. Like the murals on the second floor that were brought from the Panama-Pacific International Exposition of 1915.

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3) The four gray walls of the theater turn into vibrant projection screens. One of my favorite concerts last year was watching the Academy Award-nominated film, Les Triplets de Belleville. The music was stripped away and a live ensemble (with singers!) performed along to the animations that were projected in front of us. These visual highlights bring movement to every piece and the audience is taken on a musical journey through color and an array of settings.

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4) An archives gallery surrounds the theater. On the outside walls of the venue there is a photo gallery of San Francisco Opera’s most memorable moments. My favorite is a snapshot of their first performance that dates back to 1923. In October I had the honor of touring this gallery with Christopher Verdosci who worked with the company for fifteen years as their Assistant Costume Director. Click here to see more!

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5) This experience even pops up outside of the theater and around the city! The SF Opera Lab Pop-Ups happen in places (AKA: bars and clubs) where you would never expect to see opera. Last year they held performances at Public Works SF, The Chapel, and even Oasis! From incredible arias to duets and love songs, these casually dressed performers sang passionately with one hand while holding a cocktail in the other. Click here to read more.

The SF Opera Lab series is made up of 4 different concerts and will run from February 24 – April 27th. Personally, I’m excited for the ChamberWorks Concert that will feature the musicians of the San Francisco Opera Orchestra and The Source that is supposed to be very interactive and set in a unique arrangement for the audience.

Other Fun Facts:

  • Ticket prices start at $25!
  • The incredible Meyer Sound Constellation is run by a simple iPad
  • The first concert of the season, The Source is about Wikileaks and what Channing Manning exposed in 2010
  • There are 299 seats in the standard set-up, making every seat a GOOD seat
  • The next SF Opera Lab Pop-Up will be announced very soon…
  • The Taube Atrium Theater is located on the fourth floor of the Veteran’s Building
  • Roomful of Teeth is a West Coast premiere of four new works based on Shakespeare

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I hope to see you at one of the concerts! Make sure to follow my adventures on Instagram and like my blog to receive updates about new posts.

Opera Hair and Makeup Tutorial

It’s all in the details! I’m not talking about the thousands of notes that go into every opera production. I’m talking about all the work that goes into styling each performer to make their character believable and help make their story come to life. This summer the San Francisco Opera is presenting La Bohème and I got to go backstage in the dressing rooms and get a tutorial on Mimi’s hair and makeup with expert stylists, Jeanna Parham and Ashley Joyce.

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To give you a background on Mimi’s story; she is a seamstress who lives next door to the main character in La Bohème, Rodolfo who is a poet. When she knocks on his door and asks for him to light her candle, they instantly fall in love – love at first sight!

(You may be familiar with the Broadway hit RENT!! Yes, this is the original Rent and the inspiration behind the famous song “Light My Candle“.)

Mimi is sick with tuberculosis. The two are very poor and can not afford medicine so her sickness becomes worse as the story continues. Rodolfo feels so guilty about not being able to provide her with the proper medicine that he leaves her out of fake jealousy so that she will find a wealthier suitor. Will they end up back together? Will she live? Well, my friend, that is for me to know and for you to find out at the San Francisco Opera this summer.

Now on to the tutorial…

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When I walked in the door of the dressing rooms, I was greeted with a full spread of makeup brushes, lipsticks, rouges, and eyeshadows. A lot of their products were from MAC – a personal favorite! I was surprised to find out that the San Francisco Opera stylists personalize makeup kits for every singer and chorus member, even the men. That’s a lot of makeup!

They started off the transformation by pinning up my hair in tiny pin-curls and then putting a net over my hair to keep it out of my face. Next, they began to do a base layer with a primer and powders to shape my face and get “the canvas” ready for all the colors!

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The most expressive parts of the face are the eyes and the mouth, so to emphasize the drama and the character’s mood they highlight these features with shadows and liners. The way the artists looks in the dressing room is different from how they look under the stage lights so Ashely and Jeanna watch the dress rehearsals to make sure each performers makeup and wig are accentuated from the audiences’ point of view.

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With dark crease lines on my eyelids, filled in eyebrows and eyelash extensions, my eyes were starting to POP! To continue this bold look, Ashely lined my lips with a darker lip liner so that my mouth would be easily seen, even from the balcony. She then filled in my lip color with a lighter tone to create contrast. Lip gloss is not typically used in opera because it reflects too much light from the stage and is not appropriate for La Bohème’s time period.

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To finish off the look, they revealed this fabulous wig (made by Jeanna) that was hand tied with real hair. I was shocked to hear that each wig takes up to forty to sixty hours to make! That’s two and a half FULL days of work… for ONE wig. Nuts. When they placed the wig on my head, the complete vision of Mimi came to life. To keep the wig from coming off, they used bobby pins to secure the wig onto my pin-curls. Sometimes, performers will even wear a mic that’s tucked in their wig that can hardly be seen at the top of forehead.

I had so much fun becoming Mimi and being styled by the expert stylists Ashely and Jeanna. If you’d like to watch the full transformation that was entirely filmed on Facebook Live, click here!

To see some more of my backstage experiences, click here. To claim your tickets to San Francisco Opera’s summer performance of La Bohème, click here.

The New Way to “OPERA”

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And you thought seeing opera was for the old people with squeaky hearing aids… Not in San Francisco! The SF Opera has started a new event called SF Opera Pop-Up Lab featuring their fantastic singers but in a new and “out-of-the-box” way.

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Last Friday, over 300 people gathered at the Chapel in the Mission, yes the Mission to see opera. With drinks in hand we stood and faced the stage as if a DJ was about to play our favorite jams. But the night had so much more in store for us. A round of young operas singers came out in casual jeans and t-shirts to sing famous opera pieces including my all time favorite, Nessun Dorma. (See a clip on my new facebook page)

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I have to say, my favorite part of the concert was their HILLARIOUS memes that played in the background as the singers performed. I don’t think a lot of the performers were aware of what was behind them. Many times they would turn around and burst out laughing after they saw these “supertitles”. Everyone was cracking up and lifting up their glasses with approval. There wasn’t a dry eye in the audience.

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From incredible arias to duets and love songs, this group impressed us all and made each person fall in love (or validate their love) for opera. By us, I mean everyone, even those that have never been to an opera. Not only was this a great way for people to meet the arts, but it was a brilliant way for the arts to meet us in our current and modern society with humor, light-hearted fun and visuals that made their way on every Snapchat account in the room.

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Yup, that’s me capturing the pictures and loving every minute of the event. After the concert, the room turned into a dance party where I personally toasted to a great night with each and every artist that performed. Now that’s what I call a fantastic and memorable experience. What events have you seen recently that have inspired you?

P.S. Welcome to my new blog! I want to give you the opportunity to see and understand the truth in what you’re watching; the discipline, dedication, devotion, history and the hard work that goes into showcasing the brilliance of timeless stories and cultural performances. Follow me on my journey as I get raw footage of dress rehearsals, backstage interviews and private tours and get the inside scoop within the arts community.